What Does That REALLY Mean?

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By d-mars.com News Provider

There are so many phrases that we have heard growing up, but do we really know the meaning behind the phrases?  How many times have you heard your mom or grandma say, “Actions speak louder than words.”  We’ve all heard these phrases growing up, but had no idea what they meant.  Below are some familiar phrases and their meanings.  Enjoy as we take you back!

Phrases & Meanings

Actions speak louder than words

Meaning:

What you do carries more weight than what you say.

Background:

Sources say that this expression date back as far as 1628. It was first used in its current form in the USA by Abraham Lincoln in 1856: ‘Actions speak louder than words’ is the maxim; and, if true, the South now distinctly says to the North, ‘Give us the measures, you take the men.’

Age before beauty

Meaning:

People of more mature years should go before younger people.

Background:

This expression is believed to have been common in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, as used by some American girls when addressing elderly men. A common retort was ‘beauty before the beast.’

A bull in a china shop

Meaning:

To move awkwardly in such a way that things are likely to get broken, or to behave in a way that offends people

Background:

The current use of the phrase would appear to trace back to Frederick Marryat’s Jacob Faithful (1834):

“Whatever it is that smashes, Mrs. T. always swears it was the most valuable thing in the room. I’m like a bull in a china shop.”

 A friend in need is a friend indeed

 Meaning:

Real friends are there for you through good times and bad.

 Background:

Real friends are there for you through good times and bad.

This expression was first recorded by Quintus Ennius (239-169 bc), a Roman of Greek descent who is often considered the father of Roman poetry.

A little knowledge is a dangerous thing

 Meaning:

Incomplete knowledge of a subject can be more dangerous than no

 Background:

Way back in the first century B.C. Publilius Syrus wrote, “Better be ignorant of a matter than half know it.” Publilius, a Syrian (Aramean), was brought to Italy as a slave but won the favor of his master who both freed and educated him.

Source: www.bookbrowse.com

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