Reasons 2 Stop Smoking in 2017

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Dr. LaTronica Fisher, Contributing Writer

Smoking is the leading cause of preventable death in the United States. Cigarette smoking and exposure to secondhand smoke cause an estimated average of 438,000 premature deaths each year in the United States. Of these premature deaths:

  • 40 percent are from cancer. Cigarette smoking causes many types of cancer, including cancers of the lung, esophagus, larynx (voice box), mouth, throat, kidney, bladder, pancreas, stomach, and cervix, as well as acute myeloid leukemia.
  • 35 percent are from heart disease and stroke.
  • 25 percent are from lung disease. This includes chronic lung diseases, bronchitis, emphysema, and asthma.

What Happens When You Quit

  • Immediately after quitting smoking, heart rate and blood pressure, which is abnormally high while smoking, begin to return to normal.
  • Within a few weeks, circulation improves, you don’t produce as much phlegm, and you don’t cough or wheeze as often.
  • Food tastes better, and your sense of smell returns to normal.
  • Everyday activities no longer leave you out of breath.
  • Within several months of quitting, you experience significant improvements in lung function.
  • In one year, your risk of heart disease, heart attack, and stroke is halved.
  • In five years, many kinds of cancer, including lung, larynx, mouth, stomach, cervix, bladder, show decline in risk, and that decline approaches the risk of someone who has never smoked.
  • Conditions such as cataracts, macular degeneration, thyroid conditions, hearing loss, dementia, and osteoporosis are positively affected.
  • Nerve endings in the mouth and nose begin to regenerate, improving taste and smell.
  • You’ll have decreased risk for impotence and infertility.
  • Years will be added to your life: people who quit smoking, regardless of their age, are less likely than those who continue to smoke to die from smoking-related illness.

Preparing to Quit

Quitting is hard. But quitting can be a bit easier if you have a plan.  Before you actually quit, it’s important to know why you’re doing it.   Do you want to be healthier?  Save money?  Keep your family safe?  If you’re not sure, ask yourself these questions:

  • What do I dislike about smoking?
  • What do I miss out on when I smoke?
  • How is smoking affecting my health?
  • What will happen to me and my family if I keep smoking?
  • How will my life get better when I quit?

Dr. Fisher has a proven system that has already helped thousands to remove the restrictions to healing. Dr. Fisher assists in helping prepare the body to heal.  In addition, she helps re-educate the body to heal, produce its own hormones, and restore optimal wellness.  For more information on how to get tested, please contact Dr. Fisher at (713) 520-8188 or drfisherroad2wellness@gmail.com.

Resources:

www.tobaccofreemaine.org

www.smokefree.gov

 

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